Archive | October 20, 2014

Day 31: Equality of Normal Forces

College-Prep Physics: On Friday, we established that the table must be pushing up on the book. Today, we explored a different scenario to determine if normal forces between objects we equal in size. (Based on a similar sequence in Preconception in Mechanics.)

VOTE #1: Compare the forces between the wood stick and the car. (target)

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I set up a slow buggy driving into a wood dowel that is hanging down from a ringstand clamp. If you remove the tire treads, the buggy wheels will continue to spin, showing that the buggy is continuously pushing against the dowel.

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Some students says the forces are equal, some say the buggy is pushing harder because it’s trying to roll into the stick, and some way the stick is pushing harder to keep the buggy in place.

I don’t give the answer, but give them the next scenario instead.

VOTE #2: Compare the forces between the hand and the spring. (anchor)

Most kids say they are the same. It helps to think of a small, motionless board in place between the hand and the spring. Since the board is at rest, the hand and the spring must be pushing equally on the board. Now gently slide the board out from between the hand and the spring. Have any of the forces changed? So how do the forces compare? If I push harder on the spring, what happens? Are the forces the same now? How does the spring know how hard to push? (A lot of kids talk about the spring adjusting or compensating until the forces are equal. Some even refer to the spring lab we did previously. While the forces are ALWAYS equal, even while the spring is moving, I let that detail slide because we’ll return to the dynamic case in another lesson.)

VOTE #3: Compare the forces between the stiff and loose rubber band. (bridge)

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Again, most kids got that the rubber bands pull equally because the ring is at rest. How is this possible when one rubber band is stretched more than the other? What happens when you try to make one of the rubber bands pull harder? What happens if the ring is removed and the rubber bands are tied together? Are the forces still equal?

VOTE #4: Compare the forces between the rubber hose and the car. (bridge)

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Now I have the slow buggy drive into a piece of flexible rubber hose. The slow buggy works well because the hose will visibly flex and while keeping the buggy in place.

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Again, students say the forces are the same. How does the hose “know” how hard to push? What would happen if we replaced the slow buggy with the fast buggy?

VOTE #5: Compare the forces between the wood stick and the car. (target)

We return to the first scenario and re-vote. Students make the connection that the wooden stick still bends and the force between the car and the stick must be equal. Then I quick run through the book scenarios from the previous lesson and ask them to compare the forces (the same, the same, the same, …)

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NGSS Science and Engineering Practice #2: Developing Models
NGSS Science and Engineering Practice #6: Constructing Explanations

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